Course Syllabus: Undergraduate Criminology at UMA

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Sociology 316 (2307) and Justice Studies 316 (2308)
University of Maine at Augusta, Fall 2016
Prerequisites: Sociology 101 and Sociology 201

Assistant Professor of Social Science James Cook
Phone: 207-621-3190
E-mail: james.m.cook@maine.edu
Social Media: Google+ | Facebook | Twitter
In Case of Emergency, Contact: LeeAnn Trask, 621-3272.

Call-In Office Hours Hours: Wednesday 9:00 am – 11:00 am
Walk-In Office Hours: Thursdays 8:00 am – 9:00 am and 11:45 am – 2:15 pm at University College Rockland
Other Hours by Appointment


This course syllabus is our contract, outlining expectations for learning and the standards by which you will be evaluated. It is your responsibility as a student to read the entire syllabus and ask questions if you don’t understand a part of it. By continuing to be enrolled after the course, you indicate your agreement to abide by the syllabus’ terms.

The major sections of the syllabus are:


Course Description

This course’s emphasis on the question of crime explains this course’s identity as Justice Studies 316; our focus on the social and cultural factors leading to crime explains the course’s cross-listed alternate identity as Sociology 316. No matter which disciplinary heading you registered under, you will explore both aspects of criminology this semester. Together, we will review classic and recent theories and judge the fit between those theories and observable reality by delving into research findings regarding criminal behavior.

The subject of crime is contentious and when learning about crime we should expect to encounter controversy in the classroom, but in this course we will avoid heated confrontations centered around personal opinions about whether various crimes are morally good or bad. Indeed, we will try as much as possible to set aside our opinions and grapple with four related analytical questions. First, what makes one act a crime and another act non-criminal? Second, how can we measure the extent of crime in the United States and abroad? Third, how do we explain why crime occurs, who commits crime and who is victimized by it? How much empirical merit do these explanations have? Fourth, how have policy makers attempted to control crime and how effective have these strategies proven?

I do not expect you to agree with all the theories of crime that we will be discussing; indeed, many theories of crime do not agree with one another. On the contrary, I hope you to critically engage with each one by assessing whether the theory is logically consistent and whether its predictions correspond to empirical observations. This is the model of evaluation in the social sciences.

Course Outcomes

With successful completion of the course, you will have developed abilities applicable to Justice Studies, Social Science and general academic pursuits. You will be able to:

  1. Better Understand the Social Origins of Crime
    • Analyze the major classic and contemporary theoretical explanations for criminal behavior in society
    • Define the variety of acts defined as crimes and explain variation in the definition of crime across time and place
    • Engage in academic conversation regarding using the vocabulary of criminology
    • Review and discuss contemporary critiques of the criminal justice system
    • Consider practical solutions to lower the crime rate
  2. Develop Skills of Inquiry in Social Science
    • Read and evaluate professional research articles
    • Consider strengths and weaknesses of various methods used to observe criminal activity
    • Collect and analyze data on the commission, observance and discussion of crime in society
    • Critically assess the validity of theories about crime using social science research data
  3. Exhibit Strengthened General Academic Skills
    • Think critically and write analytically about complex social issues
    • Learn to separate analytical judgment from normative judgment
    • Identify, cite and evaluate available evidence
    • Practice descriptive and persuasive academic writing

Course Expectations

Internet Access
Internet access is required for this course in order to:

  • access the syllabus, readings, lectures, and grading materials for the course;
  • obtain social science data regarding crime;
  • submit assignments for grading;
  • use library resources; and
  • communicate with me.

I expect you to regularly check the course Blackboard page, the course website and your University of Maine @maine.edu e-mail account for messages, announcements and other useful course materials. The internet is the primary means by which you should use this course syllabus, since it contains multiple links to important online resources. If you need help obtaining your Blackboard and e-mail privileges, call the UMA Help Desk at 1-800-696-4357.

Library Access
Online access to the library of the University of Maine at Augusta is required for this course in order for you to find and read journal articles and conduct reviews of the academic literature. Use of electronic indexes and databases available through the UMA Library will be particularly important. You will need a university library card account — if you do not already have one, visit this website as soon as possible to apply for one. For technical help of any kind while using the UMA Library website and library services, contact Off-Campus Library Services through this website, by phone at 1-800-339-7323 in Maine, by phone at 1-888-266-4950 outside of Maine, or by e-mail at ocls@maine.edu.

Workload Standard
You have a right to know how much work is expected of you before you commit to taking a course and completing that work. One way to assess the workload for this course is to compare it to the workload for undergraduate criminology courses at other universities in Maine and the United States. Consider a few of these below:

  • University of Maine (Orono Campus): 3 exams, 4 short papers, 1 long paper. 1.5 chapters read per week.
  • Southern Maine Community College: Weekly quiz, 2 exams, 4 written assignments. 1.5 chapters read per week.
  • Kennesaw State University: Class participation, 2 exams, 2 papers. 2 chapters and 1 professional article read per week.
  • Washington State University: Class participation, regular quizzes, 3 exams, 3 short papers, 1 long paper. 2 chapters read per week.
  • Quinnipiac University: Class participation, 2 exams, 4 quizzes, 5 written assignments. 2 chapters read per week.
  • Indiana State University: Class participation, 5 exams, 7 quizzes, 2 written assignments, 1 presentation. 1.5 chapters read per week.

The workload set in this course (3 exams, 10 brief activities, and 1 chapter plus an occasional article read per week) is roughly comparable to the workload for other criminology courses at the institutions listed above.

Another way to assess the workload for the class is to judge it against our university’s credit hour work requirements. In alignment with the accreditation standards of the New England Association of Schools and Colleges, the University of Maine at Augusta has defined “the appropriate workload for one credit hour as the equivalent of one hour of classroom or other faculty instruction and a minimum of two hours of out-of-class work each week. Courses that convene outside of the traditional classroom may involve arrangements that differ from this particular model, but those arrangements will involve an equivalent amount of work per credit hour. Faculty in particular classes may assign a workload above this level.”

This means that for a three credit hour course such as this you should expect to dedicate approximately nine hours per week in order to succeed. If you find yourself consistently working more than nine hours per week on this course and are still not succeeding, please let me know so that I can identify the source of your trouble.

Reading and Lectures
You will need to acquire one book for this course: Introduction to Criminology by Frank Hagan, 8th edition. This book is available at the UMA bookstore, which has an online branch at umabookstore.com. Other readings are listed in the Schedule of Assignments and Readings — and these will be accessible as hyperlinks from this syllabus to other web pages and online academic journals accessible through the UMA Libraries web page via the “OneSearch” or “Journals” tabs. All reading assignments for this class are required and should be completed by the end of the week of class under which they are listed below in the Course Schedule.

Lectures proceed with the assumption that you have completed the readings in a thorough fashion. They include written text, images, audio podcasts and embedded videos — you are required to review all of these components of the lecture unless I specifically declare otherwise. Links to lectures will be added to this course syllabus and in the course Blackboard page under the link “Weekly Lectures” by the beginning of the week under which they are listed in the Course Schedule.

Due Dates, Withdrawals and Incompletes
Due Dates
All readings, exams and class activities must be completed by the due dates listed below under Schedule of Assignments and Readings. It is your responsibility to appropriately complete readings, participate in class activities, schedule your in-person exams (see below) and complete your exams within the time frame listed in this syllabus. If you know you will be busy on the day an activity is due, please turn it in early. Class activities that are turned in by you after the due date will lose 10 points during the first 24 hours they are late, will lose 25 points if they are between a day and a week late, and will lose 50 points if they are more than a week late.  Since you are able to schedule each examination within an entire allotted week to fit your schedule, there will be no makeup examinations and no extensions — be sure to plan for your exams in advance!

Policy on Withdrawals and Incompletes
The UMA Student Registration Deadline web page explains that students who submit drop cards before the official “Drop Date” in the first week of November will receive W grades for the courses they drop. After that official November “Drop Date,” faculty must assign either a W or WF (withdrew failing) W grades do not count against your grade point average; WF grades count as a F (0.00) for your grade point average. I will assign a W grade to students who drop after the first week of November if and only if they are passing the class as of the day they drop the course. If students drop after the first week of November and are not passing the class, I will assign a WF grade.

The UMA Student Handbook notes that “an incomplete (‘I’) grade is a temporary grade assigned to a course when a student has obtained permission of the instructor to complete course requirements at a later date. Incomplete grades will remain so for one semester. At the end of that period, the incomplete grade will be converted to an ‘F’ unless the instructor has authorized an extension.” I will only authorize incomplete grades for students who:

  • have already completed a majority of the work required in the course
  • are currently passing the course
  • are unable to complete work for unavoidable circumstances that they document, and
  • meet with me during this semester in office hours to negotiate and agree to complete their work by a mutually agreed upon date

The awarding of an incomplete grade is at my discretion.

Grading

Extra Credit
There are two opportunities for extra credit in this course associated with the first two exams of the course (extra credit is not available for the third exam because final grades must be posted quickly after the final exam). involves correcting an incorrect answer to your first and second exams. If you are not satisfied with the grade on your first or second exam, you may raise your grade by choosing one (and only one) exam answer on each of the first two exams for which you earned no points. Write an explanation, no more than one page long, in which you answer the question correctly, show why your initial answer was incorrect, and explain why the subject matter of the question is consequential in the study of crime. Turn in this explanation to me by e-mail (james.m.cook@maine.edu). Depending on how well you do, you will be given anywhere from no credit to full credit for that exam question. Corrections for the first exam are due October 23. Corrections for the second exam are due November 27.

Exams
There will be three exams in this class, to be scheduled by you to take some time during the Monday-to-Friday periods of September 26-30, October 24-28, and December 12-16. Each exam covers separate material; the exams are not cumulative. Exams incorporate multiple-choice, definition, skill-based and short answer questions. The exams are closed-book, which means that you may not bring any material in to the exam other than a pen. Each exam will count for 25% of your final grade. See “Extra Credit” above to find out how to earn a few more points on each of the first two exams.

Very Important: Although this is an online course, these exams are completed using pen and paper and will be proctored, requiring you to travel to a UMA campus, ITV site, University College center or another location near you to take the exams. There are dozens of these sites peppered across the state of Maine, so if you live in Maine there should be a location convenient to you.  If you live outside the state of Maine, you will be responsible for finding and paying the fee for a professional exam proctor near you.

Because I’m asking you to travel a short distance to a proctor to take the exams, I’m also flexible on the timing of your exam: you will be able to schedule a block of 3 hours for each exam at a time that works best for you within a 5-day period — but you need to take action to make the exam scheduling work. Here’s what to do:

  • All students, please go to the website http://www.learn2.maine.edu/exam during the first two weeks of the semester and choose a location at which to take your exams. You MUST sign up for an exam site during the first two weeks of the semester to ensure that appropriate exam materials will be delivered to your proctor site in a timely fashion.
  • If and only if you are living outside the state of Maine, you must also find a professional exam proctor for your exams during the first two weeks of the semester. There are many of these across the country at public universities and public libraries; if you have trouble finding a proctor where you live please let me know during the first two weeks of the semester by e-mail (james.m.cook@maine.edu) and I’ll be glad to lend you a hand. After you’ve found a proctor, visit the website https://sites.google.com/a/maine.edu/testing-location-registration/home/university-college-out-of-state-testing and fill out the web form you find there so that the folks at UMA can get a copy of my exam to your proctor.
  • All students, it is also your responsibility to contact the location you’ve chosen, before each exam, to arrange a specific day and time during each allotted exam week that is practical for both you and the site staff. If you need help contacting a proctoring site within Maine, see this list of phone numbers: http://learn.maine.edu/outreach-centers/centers-and-community-course-sites/.  If you’re having trouble making contact with your proctor, please let me know by e-mail (james.m.cook@maine.edu) and I’ll be glad to help — but please remember that scheduling and taking the exam with a proctor is your primary responsibility to arrange.

Class Activities
Completion of ten class activities will count for 25% of your final grade. Each activity is listed in the Schedule of Assignments and Readings below. When there is an activity to complete during a week, I will describe it fully at the end of that week’s lecture. To complete an activity, log in to this course’s Blackboard page (available through my.uma.edu). You should click on the “Activities” link there, find the activity assignment described in for that week’s lecture, and complete the assignment on that Blackboard page.

The point of these activities is for you to try doing something, not for you to reach perfection. You will NOT be graded on whether the work in your activity is correct or incorrect — only on whether you have completed all steps in the activity. For each activity, I will award a letter grade of 100 points if you have completed the entire activity.  If you have not completed all steps of the activity, I will award a grade of between 0 and 100 points to reflect the share of the activity that you have completed. Your overall class activity grade will be the average of the ten activity grades. Class activities that are turned in by you after the due date will lose 10 points during the first 24 hours they are late, will lose 25 points if they are between a day and a week late, and will lose 50 points if they are more than a week late.

How to Calculate your Course Grade:

Exam Grade #1 (0-100 points) _____ * .25 = _____
Exam Grade #2 (0-100 points) _____ * .25 = _____
Exam Grade #3 (0-100 points) _____ * .25 = _____
Class Activity Average (0-100 points): * .25 = _____
Final Total: = _____

Final Grade Range

A: 93 – 100
A-: 90 – 92.99
B+: 87 – 89.99
B: 83 – 86.99
B-: 80 – 82.99
C+: 77 – 79.99
C: 73 – 76.99
C-: 70 – 72.99
D+: 67 – 69.99
D: 63 – 66.99
D-: 60 – 62.99
F: 0 – 59.99

Getting Help

I’m sure that with work you can succeed in this class — but sometimes it isn’t enough to work on your own. Getting help when you need it, in the appropriate setting, can make the crucial difference between a high grade and a low grade. Here are some ways to get help when you need it:

  • Comments and Discussion Board.
    I encourage you to ask questions in class when you are unsure. In our online course, there are three ways to do this.

    1. First, each week’s lecture contains a “padlet” area near the top where I encourage you to post questions about the week’s reading. In a classroom environment, we could easily have discussion about a reading by speaking to one another. That’s not possible in an asynchronous online course, but the “padlet” area is a good alternative.  I’ll answer questions posted to each padlet during the week in which a reading should be completed.
    2. Second, each week’s lecture contains a “comments” section at the bottom. I encourage you to leave any question or comment related to that week’s lecture, and I will do my best to respond within about 24 hours. If you are uncomfortable leaving your name on a publicly visible web page, feel free to use a pseudonym.
    3. Third, you may participate in our course’s discussion board. While course lectures are posted publicly, our course discussion board is placed in the secure online environment of Blackboard. To find our course discussion board, log in to Blackboard at courses.maine.edu, and look for the “Discussion” link on the left-hand side of our course’s Blackboard page.
    4. Fourth, you can get in touch with me directly by phone, by e-mail, or in office hours (see the top of the syllabus for contact details). If you leave a voice message or send me an e-mail on a weekday, you should receive a response within 24 hours. Over the weekend or on holidays, my response time may be longer.
  • Office Hours and Other Contact.
    If you’d like to discuss the class in a private setting, please get in touch! At the top of this syllabus, I’ve indicated when my “office hours” are. Office hours are times when you don’t have to make an appointment to come in to see me.

    • Call-In Hours: Wednesdays 9:00 am – 11:00 am
    • Walk-In Hours: Thursdays 8:00 am – 9:00 am and 11:45 am – 2:15 pm at University College Rockland
    • Other Hours by Appointment — just call me at 621-3190 or e-mail me at james.m.cook@maine.edu to set up a time.
  • Writing Center.
    If you need some advice when completing your written assignments, please consider the UMA Writing Center, which maintains offices at our Bangor and Augusta campuses. The professionals at the Writing Center can help you find your voice and express yourself well. Consultations are available face to face, via Google Hangout & text chat, or through email. In addition, a special writing resource center called VAWLT is available for distance learners (that’s you). Click the links in this paragraph to learn more.
  • Technical Issues.
    If you have technical troubles with Blackboard or other UMA websites while completing your coursework, the best folks to consult are at the UMA Information Technology “helpdesk,” which you can contact by e-mail at UMAHelp@maine.edu or by phone at 207-621-3475.

    • Help That’s NOT OK.
      It’s important when using these forms of help to remember that all work must be your own. None of these forms of help should be used in a way that involves others completing work for you. For more details, see the Academic Integrity section of the syllabus below.

    If you’re feeling unsure about your performance in the course, please don’t until late in the semester to seek help, because by then much of your grade will already be set. Whether you choose to make contact through comments, the course discussion board, a visit to my office hours, personal contact with me or advice at the the Writing Center, you can be confident that the support team at UMA wants to hear from you — please don’t be shy!

    Accommodations for Students with Learning Disabilities

    If you have a learning disability which may affect your ability to participate fully in this course, it is your responsibility to request accommodations promptly and well in advance of any assignments or exams. Here’s how the process works:

    1. As soon as possible at the beginning of the semester, contact the UMA Learning Support Services Office (phone 207-621-3066, email donald.osier@maine.edu) or the Coordinator of Student Support Services at your campus or center to discuss possible learning accommodations. It is the responsibility of these professionals to determine whether you are eligible for accommodations.
    2. If the professionals in Learning Support Services or Student Support Services determine you are eligible for accommodations, I will be provided with a letter from the office notifying me confidentially that you are eligible for accommodations.
    3. After you receive approval for accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact me to make specific arrangements to fit your accommodations to the work in class. I will be happy to provide the accommodations mentioned in your letter from Learning Support Services or Student Support Services.
    4. Accommodations are not provided retroactively, and the process can take some time. This means that it’s a good idea to start the process well before accommodations are needed.More information on accommodations for students with disabilities can be found at http://www.uma.edu/disabilityservices.html.Title IX SupportThe University of Maine at Augusta is committed to providing an environment free of violence and harassment based on sex and gender. Such civil rights offences are subject to the same accountability and support as offenses based on race and national origin. If you or someone else within the UMA community is struggling with sex discrimination, sexual harassment, sexual assault relationship violence or stalking, appropriate resources can be found at http://www.uma.edu/about/title-ix-info/.

      Course Schedule of Assignments and Readings

      All readings should be completed by the end of the week under which they are listed.

      Week 1 (August 29 – September 3): Introduction to Criminology and the Relativism of Crime

      Week 2 (September 4-10): Moral Panics

      • Read Linnemann, Travis. 2012. “Mad Men, Meth Moms, Moral Panic: Gendering Meth Crimes in the Midwest.Critical Criminology 18: 95-110.
      • Read Best, Joel. 2014. “Halloween Sadism: The Evidence.” Accessible online at http://www.udel.edu/soc/faculty/best/site/halloween.html.
      • Read Victor, Jeffrey. 1993. “Satanic Cults’ Ritual Abuse of Children: Horror Or Hoax?” USA Today 122: 2582. Accessible by searching for title in Academic Search Complete database at UMA Library Databases web page.
      • Read Chick, Jack. 1987. “The Poor Little Witch.” Accessible online at http://www.chick.com/reading/tracts/0064/0064_01.asp.
      • Complete Lecture 2: Crime and Moral Panic
      • Activity 1: Syllabus and Academic Integrity
        For you to succeed in this course, it is absolutely essential that you read and understand the course syllabus and UMA’s Student Academic Integrity Code (available to read here) . Last week I asked you to read the course syllabus and the code; this week I’m asking you to take these two steps:

        1. If you have any questions about the syllabus or academic integrity questions, ask me!
        2. After you’ve asked any questions you might have, post a message in the Blackboard “Activities” section listed “Activity #1″ declaring, “I have read and understand the course syllabus for SOC/JUS 316; I agree to abide by its terms. I have read and understand the Student Academic Integrity Code; I agree to abide by its terms.” Note: if for some reason you feel you cannot make this affirmation, please contact me as soon as possible so we can talk about it; agreeing to abide by the syllabus and academic integrity is a necessary condition for taking this course.

        Activity 1 is due by September 10.

      • Activity 2: Course Survey
        Over the course of the semester, we will be considering a number of different issues related to the issue of crime. To help illustrate these issues, I’m asking you to complete a brief survey regarding the subject of crime. Because the subject of crime is sensitive, your privacy is protected in two ways. First, while you are required to send in a survey response to me in order to receive a complete activity grade, you are not required to answer any questions — you could, if you want, simply submit a blank survey with no answers on it. Second, while our course website will let me know whether you have submitted a survey response or not, I will not be able to find outwhich students sent in which survey answers — in that regard, your responses are anonymous. To receive credit for Activity 2:

        1. Log in to Blackboard and visit “Activity #2: Initial Course Survey” in the “Activities” section of our course’s Blackboard page.
        2. Submit the survey contained in “Activity #2,” with or without completed responses.

        Activity 2 is due by September 10.

      Week 3 (September 11-17): Researching and Measuring Crime

      • Read Hagan Chapter 2
      • Read Goldstein, Joseph. 2012. “Police Reports Suggest Officers May Sometimes Portray Crimes Less Seriously.” New York Times, September 16. Accessible through the “New York Times” database at UMA Library Databases web page.
      • Listen to Glass, Ira. 2010. “Is That a Tape Recorder in Your Pocket, or Are You Just Unhappy to See Me?”. This American Life, September 10.
      • Read Rayman, Graham. 2012. “The NYPD Tapes Confirmed”. Village Voice, March 7.
      • Complete Lecture 3: Measuring Crime: Follow Link Here
      • Activity 3: Evidence-Based Crime Intervention
        On pp. 35-37 of Frank Hagan’s Introduction to Criminology textbook, two sources for “evidence-based research” on effective and ineffective crime reduction methods are listed:

        1. “Preventing Crime: What Works, What Doesn’t, What’s Promising” (correct link: http://www.ncjrs.gov/works)
        2. CrimeSolutions.gov (http://crimesolutions.gov).

        Find a supposed crime reduction method that is identified in one of the sources. For the source you choose:

        1. identify the overall finding: is the method evaluated as effective, ineffective, or promising but of uncertain effectiveness?
        2. report how many studies the evaluation is based upon
        3. identify one of the research studies forming the basis of that evaluation, name the independent and dependent variables for that study, and indicate how those variables are operationalized.

        To receive credit for Activity 3, log in to Blackboard and upload your work to “Activity #3: Evidence-Based Research” in the “Activities” section of our course’s Blackboard page. Activity 3 is due by September 17.

      Week 4 (September 18-24): General Characteristics of Crime and Criminals

      • Read Hagan Chapter 3
      • Complete Lecture 4: General Characteristics of Crime and Criminals: Click here for Lecture 4
      • Activity 4: Diving into UCR Data
        1. Click here to find Table 8 from the FBI’s Crime in the United States report for 2014, the last year for which a full report is available.
        2. Find the crime statistics listed for the city or town you live in (or if you live in a very small community, statistics for the nearest city or town listed).
        3. Name the city/town, and using a combination of the city/town’s population and crime count, calculate the property crime rate per 100,000 population for that city/town.
        4. Without looking, think of another city/town that you think will have a higher property crime rate. Name that city/town and explain why you think it will have a higher property crime rate.
        5. Now look: calculate the property crime statistics for that second city/town. Was your guess correct?

        To receive credit for Activity 4, log in to Blackboard and upload your work to “Activity #4: Diving into UCR Data” in the “Activities” section of our course’s Blackboard page. Activity 4 is due by September 24.

      Week 5 (September 25 – October 1): Victimology

      • Read Hagan Chapter 4
      • Exam I, covering material from Weeks 1-4, to be completed between September 26 and September 30. See “Exams” Section of this Syllabus for Sign-Up Instructions!
      • Complete Lecture 5: Victims and Victimization
      • No activities are due this week

      Week 6 (October 2-8): Early and Classical Criminological Theories

      • Read Hagan Chapter 5
      • Read de Haan, Willem and Jaco Vas. 2003. “A Crying Shame: The Over-Rationalized Conception of Man in the Rational Choice Perspective.Theoretical Criminology 7: 29-54.
      • Complete Lecture 6: Early and Classical Criminological Theory 
      • Activity 5: Quiz (available through the “Activities” folder of our course Blackboard page). Complete by October 8.
      • Activity 6: Midterm Course Survey (available through the “Activities” folder of our course Blackboard page)
        As we near the halfway point of class, I’d like to hear from you about the aspects of class you find most rewarding and most frustrating. Because critiquing your professor could be a sensitive activity and because I’d like your comments to be as forthright as possible, I’ll ask you to participate in an anonymous and voluntary fashion. While you are required to send in a survey response to me in order to receive a complete activity grade, you are not required to answer any questions — you could (if you chose) simply submit a blank survey with no answers on it. While our course website will let me know whether you have submitted a survey response or not, I will not be able to find out which students sent in which survey answers — in that regard, your responses are anonymous. To receive credit for Activity 6, fill out the Midterm Course Survey by October 8 by visiting the “Activity 6: Midterm Course Survey” section of the “Activities” page on our course’s Blackboard site.Week 7 (October 9-15): Biological and Psychological Theories of Crime

        • Read Hagan Chapter 6
        • Complete Lecture 7: Biological and Psychological Theories of Crime (click here to access Lecture 7)
        • Activity 7: Identifying Criminals
          To receive credit for Activity 7, visit this page to review photos of various people and guess whether they are convicted criminals, and if so for what crimes. Then log in to Blackboard and register your guesses by visiting “Activity #7: Biological and Psychological Theories of Crime” in the “Activities” section of our course’s Blackboard page. Activity 7 is due by Sunday, October 16.

        Week 8 (October 16-22): Anomie and Social Process Theories of Crime

        Week 9 (October 23 – October 29): Social Control and Developmental Theories of Crime

        • Read Hagan Chapter 7 pp. 173-180
        • Complete Lecture 9: Developmental Theories of Crime (click here to access Lecture 9)
        • Exam II, covering material from Weeks 5-8, to be completed between October 24 and October 28. See “Exams” Section of this Syllabus for Sign-Up Instructions!
        • No Activities this week

        Week 10 (October 30 – November 5): Critical Theories of Crime

        Week 11 (November 6-12): Property and White-Collar Crime Crime

        • Read Hagan Chapter 10 and Chapter 11
        • Complete Lecture 11: Consolidation of Prior Learning (click here to access Lecture 11)
        • Activity 9: Corpwatch
          This week, I’d like you to visit the website CorpWatch (at http://www.corpwatch.org/ and find an article of interest to you in which a corporation is described as being engaged in a socially harmful activity. To receive credit for Activity 9, upload the following work by November 12 on the “Activity 9: Corpwatch” page in the “Activities” section of our course Blackboard site:

          1. Name the article and identify its URL.
          2. Describe the allegedly harmful corporate act(s) forming the main subject of the article.
          3. Indicate whether, for these acts, any person or organization been charged with or convicted of a crime.
          4. Indicate whether, in your opinion, any person or organization should be charged with a crime for this act. If so, what crime and on what basis? If not, why not?

        Week 12 (November 13-19): Violent Crime

        • Read Hagan Chapter 9
        • Lecture 12: Violent Crime (click here to access Lecture 12)
        • Activity 10: Quiz (posted under Blackboard “Activities” section). Complete by November 19.

        November 20 – November 26: Thanksgiving Week — Take a Break!

        Week 13 (November 27 – December 3): Fear, Terrorism and Political Crime

        Week 14 (December 4-10): Politics and Public Order Crime

        • Read Hagan Chapter 14
        • Lecture 14: What is Public Order Crime? (click here to access Lecture 14)
        • No activities are due this week: Study (and see the note in Lecture 14 on the exam)!

        Week 15 (December 14-20): Final Exam on Weeks 9-14

        • Final Exam must be completed between December 12 and 16. See “Exams” Section of this Syllabus for Sign-Up Instructions!
        • No readings for this week

        Academic Integrity

        The following is a verbatim quote of the Student Academic Integrity Code (available under the “Policies” tab of the Student Handbook for all students at the University of Maine at Augusta. The words below not only describe the general expectations of UMA for all students — that your work must be your own — but my particular expectations for your conduct in this class. You are responsible for learning the standards of academic integrity and ensuring that your work meets these standards. Failure to do so may result in appropriate sanctions — and nobody wants you to end up in that circumstance. If you have any questions about whether you might be violating standards of academic integrity, do two things: First, stop. Second, if you’re in doubt, consult with me to find out what the right course of action would be.

        “Plagiarism: the representation of others’ words or ideas as one’s own. For example,

        • Submitting as one’s own work an examination, paper, homework assignment, or other project (laboratory report, artistic work, computer program, etc.) that was created entirely or partially by someone else.
        • Failure to use quotation marks to signal that one is using another person’s precise words. Even brief phrases must be enclosed in quotation marks.
          Failure to identify the source of quotations and paraphrases. Of course one must cite the source of quotations; one must also cite the source of ideas and information that is not common knowledge even when paraphrased (presented in one’s own words). Sources include unpublished as well as published items — for example, books, articles, material on the Internet, television programs, instructors’ lectures, and people, including other students, friends, and relatives.
        • Creating an academically dishonest paraphrase. When paraphrasing the author must find their own way of expressing the original meaning. Simply inserting synonyms into the source’s sentence structures is plagiarism.
        • Failure to identify the source of the elements of a nonverbal work (for example, a painting, dance, musical composition, or mathematical proof) that are derived from the work of others.”

        “Cheating: the use or attempted use of unauthorized assistance in an examination, paper, homework assignment, or other project. For example,

        • Copying answers from another student’s examination.
        • Communicating in any way with another student or a third party during an examination without the permission of the instructor.
          Using unauthorized materials or devices (e.g. notes, textbooks, calculators, electronic devices) during an examination without the permission of the instructor.
        • Obtaining and/or reading a copy of an examination before its administration without the permission of the instructor.
        • Collaborating with other students or third parties on a take-home examination, paper, homework assignment, or other project without the permission of the instructor.”

        Additional violations of academic integrity include:

        • “Duplicate Work: Submitting a paper or other project in more than one course without the permission of the instructors. Students are expected to produce original work for each course. A student should not submit identical or substantially similar papers or projects in two different courses (in the same or different semesters) unless both instructors have given their permission.
        • “Facilitating Academic Dishonesty: assisting another student’s academic dishonesty. For example,
          • Writing a paper or other project for another student.
          • Permitting another student to copy from one’s examination, paper, homework assignment, or other project.
          • Assisting another student on a take-home examination, paper, homework assignment, or other project if one knows or suspects such assistance is not authorized by the instructor.
        • “Fabrication: For example,
          • Fabrication of data: Inventing or falsifying the data of a laboratory experiment, field project, or other project.
          • Fabrication of a citation: Inventing a citation for a research paper or other project.
          • Alteration of an assignment: Altering a graded examination, paper, homework assignment, or other project and resubmitting it to the instructor in order to claim an error in grading.”

        In this class, each one of the forms of academic dishonor described above is expressly forbidden. I encourage you to share lecture notes with other students and to study together for exams, but you may not collaborate with other students on graded assignments, and you may not rely on anything other than your own pen and your own brain during an examination or quiz.

        Changes to this Syllabus

        As the semester progresses, I will update this syllabus by adding links to new lectures by the beginning of the week under which they are listed. I will also update the syllabus by adding links to quizzes that count as “activities” for grading. I do not anticipate the need to make any other changes to this syllabus, but I reserve the right to do so under extenuating circumstances or as unforeseen events may warrant. Should make any changes to the syllabus, I will communicate these in advance and through multiple means — by changing the syllabus itself, by making an announcement in class and by posting message to the course Blackboard website.

       

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